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Prism | Civil Rights History Inspiring Criminal Justice Reform & Measure R

Selma to LA: How Civil Rights History Inspired Criminal Justice Reform and Measure R

February 25, 2020. Our Prism. Measure R was passed in California in March of 2020, allowing mentally ill Black people to receive medical care and not the unfair torture of incarceration. Patrisse delves into how civil rights history inspired a movement that only continues to grow among nationwide Black communities oppressed by the police and prison states.

Credit: Gabe Pierce

The Guardian | Panel for Ta-Nehisi Coates v Cornel West

The Panel/Ta-Nehisi Coates v Cornel West: Black Academics and Activists Give Their Verdict

December 22, 2017. The Guardian. One of the leading Black intellectuals in the US, Ta-Nehisi Coates, got into a row with Harvard scholar Cornel West on Twitter in December of 2017. Coates hit back, listing all his articles criticizing US foreign policy, before completely deleting his Twitter account and backing out of social media. Commentators Melvin Rogers, Patrisse Cullors, Carol Anderson, and Shailja Patel discuss the impact of this debate amidst the struggle for racial equality.

Malcolm X Revisited

Malcolm X Revisited

Malcolm X Revisited 

As part of Highways’ BEHOLD Festival 2016, Patrisse Khan-CullorsJanaya Khan, and FOREMOST present Malcolm Revisited, which explores the iconic historical figure, Malcolm X, through workshops, live performance pieces, and a visual exhibit dedicated to Malcolm’s current impact on the movement for Black lives.

The entire world has been impacted by #BlackLivesMatter, a moment-turned-movement that pushed this country in particular to have a new conversation about what it means to protect Black lives. Art allows for conversations to happen across generations, gender, race, and ability. This piece is a contribution to #BlackLivesMatter, Malcolm X, and the past and current freedom fighters in this movement.

 

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The Guardian | Abolitionists Still Have Work to Do in America

Abolitionists Still Have Work to Do in America

July 30, 2017. The Guardian. The term “abolitionist” may have historic roots but it’s just as relevant today as it was during the Civil War. In fact, abolitionists are likely more important now than they have ever been. Patrisse Cullors takes a look at why some steps towards emancipation have been made, but Black people are far from being free.

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The Guardian | Sheriff David Clarke Is a Dangerous Bigot

Sheriff David Clarke Is a Dangerous Bigot. He Must Be Resisted at Every Turn.

May 19, 2017. The Guardian. Former law enforcement official David Clarke served as Sheriff of Milwaukee County in Wisconsin from 2002 to 2017. When Black lives needed an ally, Clarke took his place among white nationalist supporters like Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions, reminding activists of the increasing need to organize and resist.  

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Knot

Knot

Patrisse performed Knot, an exploration of how gang culture surrounded Nipsey Hussle, at the FORM festival in June of 2019.

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The Guardian | Effect of Trump’s Election on Black People

Trump’s Election Means More Police Brutality Towards Black People

November 11, 2016. The Guardian. As soon as Donald Trump was elected, Patrisse Cullors foresaw the effects of his presidency on police brutality towards black people. She reflects on a nationwide history of Black communities being terrorized, realizes its potential for only getting worse, and resolves to fight harder than ever.